Author: Head Honcho

Amy Clipston’s A PLACE AT OUR TABLE and Bringing Characters Together

Kayla Dienner is a sweet young woman who works as a waitress at her family’s restaurant.  She was pretty close to a guy named Abram, but he broke up with her shortly after her firefighter brother died while on a call.  (What a jerk, right?)  Jamie is a firefighter who is sweet on Kayla.  See how his vocation is an obstacle to their relationship?  Kayla and Jamie are two great young people…will they be able to make and build a connection? Continue Reading

Amy Lillard’s THE QUILTING CIRCLE and Building a World

Have you ever loved someone who didn’t love you back in the same way?  Have you ever gotten what you wanted at the exact wrong time and wondered how you would cope?  Have you ever felt mistreated by someone you love and hoped they would come around before you take off?   Continue Reading

Tony Vanderwarker’s WRITING WITH THE MASTER and How John Grisham Does It

Writing is a solitary pursuit.  You can have a thousand writer friends, participate in a hundred workshops and have an editor who calls you every day, but in the end, it’s just you and the blank page.  And one of the sad ironies of writing is that you can never, ever read your own work outside of your own consciousness.  Even if you put your novel aside for fifty years, it’s still you turning the pages.  Continue Reading

James Pietragallo and Jimmie Whisman’s CRIME IN SPORTS Podcast and Why Comedians Can Do Almost Anything

A lot of athletes make mistakes.  Big mistakes.  Plaxico Burress went into a strip club with a gun in his sweatpants for some reason.  Steve Howe did nearly all of the cocaine.  Darryl Strawberry did the rest of it.  James Pietragallo and Jimmie Whisman tell the stories of wayward athletes on their Crime in Sports podcast.

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GWS Companion: The Comedians of Budd Friedman’s THE IMPROV

You may have read my writing craft essay about Budd Friedman’s autobiography/biography of The Improv.  It occurred to me that many folks may not have seen the work of some of the standups who figure into the book.  That isn’t funny at all.  So here’s a journey through a very, very small fraction of the comedians who figure into the story of The Improvisation.

Robert Klein

Richard Lewis

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Budd Friedman’s THE IMPROV and Leading with Your Strongest Material

In the mood to watch some great standup comedy?  I’ve compiled a GWS Companion that features 20 of the comedians who figure into the long and storied history of The Improv.  Click here if you wish to laugh.

There are so many reasons that I love comedy, but I think the primary one is that comedians have always been the true conscience of a society.  The court jester is the only person who can speak truth to the king.  Comedians push boundaries and shape how we view the language.  (Just this morning, I heard an NPR commentator mention how a politician was using rhetoric that “ratcheted the tension to 11.”)

So much of today’s comedy can be traced to Budd Friedman and his Improv, the first comedy club of its kind.  The brick wall in the background?  The cutthroat competition and dysfunctional friendships between comics?  That was all him.  The Improv was the incubator for comics like Jerry Seinfeld, Richard Lewis, Andy Kaufman, Elayne Boosler…everyone. Continue Reading

Marta Perry’s SECOND CHANCE AMISH BRIDE and Making the Most of Restrictions

Caleb is not experiencing one of the high points of his life.  His estranged wife died, leaving him to care for two kids.  He broke his leg in an accident and cannot properly tend to his dairy farm.  And worst of all, his wife’s sister has arrived from her own Amish enclave to help out in the household.  Caleb isn’t a big fan of Jessie; perhaps she reminds him of Alice, the wife who abandoned the family before returning when she was close to death.

Jessie did her best to reach out to her sister, but failed.  And she has a secret of her own: she had a huge crush on Caleb before Alice, the prettier sister, captured his attention.  Spending time around him is painful, even all these years later.  (Purchase the book from the publisher, Kobo, Barnes and Noble, or Amazon.  Here’s her Facebook page and web site.) Continue Reading

Wanda E. Brunstetter’s AMISH COOKING CLASS: THE BLESSING and the Comfort of the Familiar

Several months ago, I was briefly a guest at the fictional Troyer farm, where Heidi and Lyle offer you their hospitality and their love of humanity.  Their farm is a calm and peaceful place: plenty of sunshine, plenty of nature.  Yes, things sometimes go wrong for the Troyers and the people around them, but there are no politics.  People are focused on growing in love for others.  They want to nourish their bodies, hearts, and minds.

Well, ladies and gentlemen, Heidi is teaching more of her famous cooking classes.  Wanda E. Brunstetter was kind enough to chronicle what happened in her new book, Amish Cooking Class: The Blessing.  Here’s the book trailer.

You can book your own return trip (or your first) to Walnut Creek by purchasing the novel from your local indie, Kobo, Barnes & Noble, or Amazon.

When the first book ended, Heidi was expecting to adopt the child of one of her students.  At the beginning of this book, Kendra has changed her mind.  Heidi is understandably disappointed, but decides not to dwell on her grief.  The formula holds; there are six more students, including a caterer and a food critic, a wife who feels neglected, and a teenage girl whose mother took off.  Do I even need to say that Heidi and her six students will have meaningful experiences that bring them closer to each other and to their faith?

The great charm of this novel (and of many Amish inspirational romances, however you wish to label them) is that the conflicts are very meaningful to the characters, but everything usually works out.  The characters are sometimes cross with each other, but always in a relatable manner that doesn’t kick up too much of the reader’s own psychological pain.  Ms. Brunstetter offers us a passage into another world, where we can escape…all of the things.

Ms. Brunstetter also takes her time.  Her prose is always clear, and she often explains things that don’t need to be explained.  I sometimes wonder what an MFA workshop might say about the prose.  (MFA workshops, of course, are also known as the “Circle of Love,” so dubbed by the great Lee K. Abbott.)  Some might say that there are “inefficiencies” in the prose.  I contend that the prose fits the tone of the novel and the story its author is trying to tell.  

Here’s an example.  It’s the very first paragraph, in fact:

brun1

Loving and good-hearted workshop members may wonder:

  • Do we need to know that Heidi peeled and cut the onion?  Why not just say “cut?”  Isn’t it a given that a person peels an onion they are going to cut and use as an ingredient?
  • Is “savory” necessary?  Isn’t meat loaf inherently savory?
  • Do we need to know the reason Heidi is feeling the gust of wind?  Do we need to know that the room is being aired out?

Another example:

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  • Does Heidi need to go to the window to look out the window?  It’s a window; windows are generally transparent.  Why couldn’t she just look?

There are a lot of examples of this kind of prose, and I make the case that the “inefficiencies” are a great benefit to the book.  Ms. Brunstetter’s novel, it seems to me, has two goals, give or take:

  1. To tell an uplifting story that helps people in some spiritual manner.  (Ms. Brunstetter seems like a kind woman, so I’m guessing she’d prefer the reader feel a Christian kind of love, but she’d take whatever she can get in that regard.)
  2. To transport the reader to Walnut Creek and immerse them in the Amish world and and way of life.

When you consider these goals, the “inefficiencies” are anything but.  Why do Amish people use buggies instead of cars?  So they can devote more thought and time to hard work and faith.  (Among other reasons.)  The Blessing is not the kind of book in which the author wishes to experiment with narrative or to force the reader to do a lot of work.  No, Ms. Brunstetter wants the book to be a happy comfort, and her prose style helps her achieve that goal.

Amish Cooking Class: The Blessing is a welcome return to Walnut Creek.  Ms. Brunstetter avoids the pitfalls of writing the second book in a series; this one is sufficiently different from the first to remain interesting though it follows the same formula.  The reader finds themselves pulling for all of the characters because we can all relate to their concerns in one way or another.  (We want our significant others to love us, we want to fulfill our need to nurture, we sometimes struggle with forgiving those who have abandoned us…)

There are many great writers in the Amish genre, and Ms. Brunstetter is one of those near the top.  If you’ve never read in the genre, consider giving this or another of her books a try.

 

BONUS: Here is a great talk that Ms. Brunstetter gave to a library gathering.  She is not the same kind of writer as we hear in the “MFA crowd,” and that is a good thing.  She is very much a writer and storyteller, and we would all benefit from understanding more of the industry that we inhabit.  (Or to which we aspire.)

Beth Wiseman’s PLAIN PROPOSAL and Stout Stakes

The course of true love never did run smooth, even in an Old Order Amish community.  Miriam has been in love with Saul Fisher since they were children.  Now they are on the cusp of adulthood, the time when young men and women must decide which paths in life they will take.  Miriam expects she and Saul will marry and remain in the community.  Saul, on the other hand, has a job offer from a Pittsburgh restaurant and can’t wait to leave, though it means abandoning his brothers.

Beth Wiseman very much does her job in Plain Proposal, part of her Daughters of the Promise series.  Yes, the book is a romance novel, and not even the kind that features “naughty.”  Yes, this is a Christian novel, and one of Ms. Wiseman’s explicit desires is to buffet the reader’s belief in Christianity.  If you don’t avail yourself of these kinds of novels on occasion, you’re really missing out.  Writers such as Ms. Wiseman are great because they make promises to the reader and then fulfill them.  What else do you want from a storyteller?  (Please consider purchasing the book through Ms. Wiseman’s web site, from your local indie store, from Kobo, from Barnes and Noble, or from Amazon.)

Okay, so because this is an Amish/romance/Christian/inspirational novel, we can be pretty sure that the book is not going to feature a worldwide alien invasion or a Silence of the Lambs situation.  Still, Ms. Wiseman must find a way to fulfill her responsibility to the reader.  She must give us a story in which the events matter very deeply to the characters.  There must be something important at stake.

Now look what Ms. Wiseman does in Chapter One.  We learn that the book is structured in such a way that there are alternating sections from the viewpoints of different characters.  It’s immediately clear that Miriam and Saul fancy each other.  Boooooooring.  That’s not enough to make a good book, and Ms. Wiseman knows it.  After we hear about the impending arrival of Miriam’s pretty Englisch cousin (potential love rival?!?!?), the author ends the chapter from Saul’s perspective thus:

But as she looked up at him with a smile that threatened to melt his resolve, he knew that he was going to do the unthinkable–date her for the summer.  Then leave her in August.  God, forgive me.

Oh, snap!  You don’t need to be Amish to know that this is a SERIOUS situation.  (And it’s a serious situation, regardless of your religion or way of life.)  We don’t know Miriam or Saul very well because we’re only in Chapter One, but Ms. Wiseman sets up some very big stakes:

Miriam and Saul are both in their rumschpringe, the “running around” time in which a young person decides whether he or she wishes to be baptized into the Amish way of life permanently.  Both have been running around for a while…time is running out before they must make a decision.

Miriam wants to live in the community and to marry Saul.

Saul wants to leave the community but also wants to have a sweet, romantic summer with Miriam. 

These two goals are contradictory!  If one of them gets what he or she wants, the other will be heartbroken!

I loved the end of Chapter One because of how succinctly and powerfully Ms. Wiseman established the stakes.  I was reminded of a very different work of art: The Terminator.  After Kyle Reese and the T-800 shoot up the Tech Noir nightclub around Sarah Connor, Kyle makes the stakes of the story very, very clear: “Come with me if you want to live.”

Miriam’s cousin Shelby is also a young woman, but she’s not Amish.  Her parents are splitting up, and Shelby has made some poor decisions.  (Unfortunately, this is an Amish/romance/inspirational-type novel, so the reader does not get any of the dirty details.  I suppose Ms. Wiseman leaves it to your imagination.)  As another of the book’s main characters, SHELBY NEEDS A REASON TO BE IN THE RABER HOME.  SHE NEEDS TO HAVE SOME STAKE IN THE NOVEL.  So the author is careful to give her one at the end of Chapter Two.  Shelby writes in her diary:

…Maybe I’m being punished.  I don’t know.  I just know that I feel bad all the time.  I want to be loved, but my heart is so empty and my faith in life, in God, is gone.  I don’t have anything to live for.

So what is Shelby’s arc through the rest of the book?  Of course.  She’s going to find a reason to live.  (It’s not a spoiler alert to reveal that God is a part of the reason.)

Ms. Wiseman’s book is a fun and quick read because she made the characters’ goals so clear, even though she puts poor Miriam and Saul through a lot of changes of minds and hearts.  Even though the story and characters evolve (particularly Miriam’s mother, Rebecca!), the reader always has a firm grasp of what the characters want and why it matters to them. 

Boris Fishman’s DON’T LET MY BABY DO RODEO: The Author Responds to My GWS QuickCraft!

Friends, my GWS QuickCraft posts are a way for me to bring attention to more works and more authors.  (Sadly, more people are likely to see these bits of writing craft advice than the regular essays I write, but that’s the way things are now…)

In a recent post, I wrote about Boris Fishman‘s most recent novel, a critically praised book called Don’t Let My Baby Do Rodeo.  (Purchase the book from your local indie store, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, or Amazon.)

Here’s what I posted on Facebook and Twitter:

I was curious about the reasoning behind one of the choices Mr. Fishman made on his crucial first page.  Well, Mr. Fishman responded to me and explained why he chose the word he did.  Even better, he was happy to share his thought process with all of us.  (Check out his Facebook author page.)

So why did Mr. Fishman plop that prefix on “humid” instead of choosing one of the words that would easily do the job?

“Arid” would not work there, I think — when the humidity briefly lets up in New Jersey, it’s drier, but I wouldn’t say “arid,” a word that calls up the desert. “Dry” works a little better, but it also doesn’t quite capture the feeling, I think. I think the most salient aspect of the experience is the sense of reprieve from an onslaught. It’s conditioned by the onslaught. So you’re not dry so much as briefly non-humid. At least that was my mind process, I think.

What an interesting explanation!  Remember: we can make any choice we like, so long as the choice achieves the desired effect.